The last few days, I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about the upcoming fall tour. Lots of midwest dates. Lots of driving. Much of the show will remain the same, mostly because I’ve busted my ass to make those parts great and there are millions of people who haven’t seen it. There are some new things that nobody (in this country) has seen that I’m excited about too. New music in the show, too. When I’m on the road doing the show night after night, changing the music can get me super excited to get onstage and even changes the way I perform sometimes too. Whether it’s for 30 people in a cafeteria or 2,000 people in an auditorium, I still get the pre-show nerves every time I go onstage. Those are good 🙂 The tour schedule, as always, is at http://michaelkentlive.com/tour. That reminds me of something else. I’m working with my friend Jon to bring a re-vamped website to you very soon. We’re spending the week in Chicago next week to work on that and some other performing artsy things.

peace, love and new stuff,
MK

Just got word I’ll be returning to perform at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, OH again on August 23rd. Bowling Green has recently become one of my favorite schools to play, partly because of it being so close to home, but mostly because of the ROCKIN crowds I’ve had there the last couple times. Two weeks ago, we had over 650 in attendance! If you’re near Northwest Ohio on August 23rd, be sure to catch the show!

Tour Schedule

For a complete list of shows, visit http://michaelkentLIVE.com/tour

The Magic Newswire is a blog/podcast for magicians.  There you will see interviews with entertainers like David Blaine, Lance Burton, Neil Patrick Harris and many others.  I was recently interviewed about playing colleges and about my recent trip to Korea.

You can listen to the interview via flash HERE.

It’s back to the grind performing around these 50 United States.  I started off my return from Korea performing at Indiana University Southeast.  We had a small crowd (about 50), but the Student Programming Council was thrilled with the turnout!  The mascot at IUS (I think would be cooler if the initials were IUSE), is not the Hoosier.  It’s the Grenadier.  I didn’t know what that was.  I thought that’s the stuff they put in coke to make homemade cherry coke.  I was informed that is GrenaDINE and that a Grenadier is a person in the war who throws grenades.  So I had some fun with that onstage.  Here are some photos from the show.

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The photos were taken my by friend, U-Gene Dinsmore, a professional wrestler who I met in Korea. After the show, U-Gene picked me up in his sweet ride and we grabbed some food.

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From there, I headed back to Ohio to perform at Walsh University’s Lil Sibs Weekend. I had a great time at Walsh. The students and staff there couldn’t have been nicer. I also did one of the more fun shows I’ve done in awhile – it was very high-energy. Normally for a larger crowd (this was almost 400 people), the energy doesn’t have to be as high because I’m normally on a larger stage and the sound and lights do all the work. I can be a little more subtle and let the laughs come. But for this show, there were tons of kids in the audience and the room was big and dark with a riser stage. (Side note: Walsh did an EXCELLENT job of setting up this multi-purpose room for the event). I was running around and yelling the whole show. One of the high-lights was when Dominico, a 9 year old, gave me a $20 to use for the trick. We then learned that someone else had lent the $20 to him and I was trying to give him advice on how to spend it. He wouldn’t stop doing that snappy thing you do with your hand when you’re trying to pack your dip. It was awesome.

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I did my own intro to this show, which is something I started doing in Korea. I come out, as if I’m part of the staff (at Walsh, I wore one of their T-shirts). Since I’m not famous, they have no clue what Michael Kent looks like as I’m reading about MK’s accomplishments. Then I leave the stage, take off the t-shirt, and take the stage again, saying, “It’s me….I’m him.”

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It was a fun show and I hope to return to Walsh again!

Finally, you can now receive FREE text message alerts from me if you want (standard txt rates apply). Basically, they’ll just let you know if there are really exciting things happening or if I’m performing in your area. Don’t worry, I won’t be texting the crap out of you with stuff like “I just ate a WHOLE habanero pepper!” Although that WOULD be pretty amazing. Click the thingy below if you want to sign up to receive the text messages.

That’s all I’ve got for now.

peace love and habaneros,
MK

Originally Posted on 2/26/08

Source: Northeastern News
By Sean Leviashvili

Michael Kent worked his magic as he performed a stand-up routine at afterHOURS Wednesday.

As part of BananAwareness Week, Travis Weisberger, showcases chair for the Council for University Programs, arranged for Kent to perform at Northeastern. Kent is known for putting his own spin on a series of magic tricks by interacting with the audience and treating his act as a comedy routine, a task he admits can be a challenge.

“I started doing comedy in college,” Kent said. “It is the most difficult thing I’ve ever done. A comic only has his personality to use [on stage], and I try to bring it to the magic tricks and give them personality.”

Performing in front a crowd of about 200 people, Kent brought forth a series of magic tricks that made audience members like Yuliya Sysevich, a sophomore marketing major, wonder what his secret was.

Syesevich was initially called to the stage when Kent asked for an audience member with “excellent intuition.” To assist Kent with a trick involving a broken glass bottle, four inflated paper bags and Kent’s left hand, Syesevich had to guide him through a step-by-step process in eliminating the bags. One contained the glass bottle with the sharp side up.

With each elimination, Kent crushed the bag with his hand.

“Remember, I’m using my hands here,” Kent said to Syesevich. “If you screw this up, it’s the end of my career and social life as well.”

The only bag Syesevich did not select concealed the jagged glass bottle.

“All of his tricks were really surprising,” Syesevich said. “With each one I was like ‘Wow, how did he do that?'”

Syesevich had an intuitive hunch that everything would turn out all right, but other students, including Grace Turnbull, a middler behavioral neuroscience major, were not as confident.

“I was terrified when he was smashing those glasses,” Turnbull said.

The tricks, along with the jokes and sarcasm, continued for about an hour as Kent brought Nani Stoick, a middler music industry major, to the stage, only to have her volunteer her $100 bill for a trick. After writing her name on the bill, Stoick placed it in an envelope and left the rest up to Kent and his magic. She watched as Kent pretended to shred the bill.

After five minutes of brewing curiosity, Kent returned Stoick’s money to her, retrieving it from a small metal box.

“For a split second I was worried,” Stoick said. “I had a feeling it would be in the box but I have no idea how it got there. I was impressed.”

As Kent’s routine continued, he left the audience pondering the question: what came first, the chicken or the egg? In this case, it was the chicken – a rubber one. With a volunteer from the audience, Kent conducted a card trick in which he managed to transfer a card selected by the audience member to a plastic egg inside a rubber chicken.

When Weisberger first saw this trick performed at the National Association for Campus Activities conference in November, he knew Kent would draw attention at Northeastern and arranged for him to perform.

“It was the chicken trick that sold us,” Weisberger said, “and his smart-ass personality.”

Prior to his performance, Kent eased audience members into his techniques by speaking with them at afterHOURS and promoting the event at the dining halls during the day. Making the audience comfortable and entertaining them is the priority, Kent said.

Whether it involves a rubber chicken, the chance of a bleeding palm or the money to pay for it, Kent said the most important thing is giving people a chance to enjoy themselves, rather than get frustrated, which Kent said is often the result of magic tricks.

“As a kid,” Kent said, “I was interested in magic and used it to compensate for my lack of a social life. I did magic in college to meet girls, and now I do it to pay the bills.”